SSI FAQ

SSI: Supplemental Security Income for Adults

SSI is a federal program administered by the Social Security Administration (SSA) to provide monthly cash payments to people with disabilities who have little to no income and fewer than $2000 in assets. Children under age 18 can receive SSI, but family income is considered in the eligibility determination. Once a child turns 18, only income and assets belonging to the individual are considered.
An application can be started online, by phone, or in person at your local social security office. https://www.ssa.gov/benefits/disability/
Eligibility is based on two factors: financial situation and disability status. Disability, for SSI purposes, means that a person has a physical or mental condition that is expected to continue for at least a year or more, and prevents the person from holding employment sufficient to support themselves. Developmental disabilities frequently result in a disability for SSI purposes, but a diagnosis alone is not enough. Applicants must show medical, educational, or vocational evidence that they are not able to engage in meaningful work.
There are several types of information that may be needed to establish disability. Medical information, of course, will be needed - doctors, treatments, medications, etc will all be needed to establish that a physical or mental condition exists. The medical information will also establish the severity of the condition. In addition to medical information, some people may need to add other information in order to demonstrate that the person is not able to engage in meaningful employment. This could include documents from educational evaluations and special education reviews, information about attempts to engage in employment (if any), or statements from therapists and other professional providers.